Manoa Recognized as Disaster Ready Community

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE
Hawaii Emergency Management Agency

DAVID Y. IGE
GOVERNOR

MAJOR GENERAL ARTHUR J. LOGAN
DIRECTOR OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

VERN T. MIYAGI
ADMINISTRATOR OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

NEWS RELEASE
August 24, 2017

BE READY MANOA RECEIVED DISASTER RESILIENT
RECOGNITION AT 9th ANNUAL MANOA VALLEY NEIGHBORHOOD SECURITY WATCH MEETING

HONOLULU — The community group Be Ready Manoa was honored as a disaster resilient community yesterday by local, state, and federal officials during the 9th Annual Manoa Valley Neighborhood Security Watch Meeting. Be Ready Manoa received recognition as a disaster resilient community through the Hawaii Hazards Awareness and Resilience Program (HHARP).

Distinguished guests that joined in honoring Be Ready Manoa’s designation as a disaster resilient community included:
• Representative Isaac Choy
• Vern Miyagi, Administrator of the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency
• Bruce E. Oliveira, Community Programs Director, State of Hawaii Department of Defense
• Kevin Richards, Natural Hazards Planner, Hawaii Emergency Management Agency
• Ann Kobayashi, Honolulu City Councilmember
• Crystal van Beelen, Disaster Preparedness Officer, Department of Emergency Management
• John Bravender, Warning Coordination Meteorologist, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Be Ready Manoa is the fifth community to achieve this recognition. Waimanalo, Kailua, Aina Haina and Joint Base Pearl Harbor are the other communities.

HHARP is a statewide program designed to guide communities through a disaster preparedness process that will empower them before, during, and after natural disasters such as hurricane, flash flood, and tsunami. Completion of HHARP includes presentations on local hazards and guidance in creating a community emergency plan.
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Media Contact:
Arlina Agbayani
Public Relations Officer
808-620-5423

Mahalo,
Arlina Agbayani
Public Relations Officer
Hawaii Emergency Management Agency (HI-EMA)
3949 Diamond Head Road
Honolulu, HI 96816
Cellular: 808-620-5423




Upcoming Events – Summer and Fall 2017

Windward CERT ‘Round Robin’
August 26, 8:30 am to 12:30 pm
Kaneohe LDS Church, 46-117 Halaulani St.,
Kaneohe, HI 96744
Manoa CERT Battery Harlow Exercise (Diamond Head)
September 2, show up at 7:15 am, should end around 1:00 pm

Manoa CERT Graduation Celebration (Potluck)
September 2, 5:00 pm
U.H. Manoa College Hill, 2230 Kamehameha Ave

Ewa Beach Preparedness Fair
September 9, 8:00-10:30 & 10:30-1:00 (two shifts)
Ewa Makai Middle School, 91-6291 Kapolei Parkway
 
Kailua CERT Exercise
September 23, 8:00 am-12:00 pm
Kailua High School ROTC Building



Beware The Northeast Quadrant

As of now it looks like Iselle, after hitting the Big Island, will pass south of the other islands.  If it does, Oahu may get brushed by the north side of the hurricane. As discussed below, the northeast quadrant of the hurricane has the strongest winds, the most wind shear and the highest storm surge.  So, the fact that the center passes to the south does not mean that we are out of the woods.  We still need to be concerned.

 

WHY ARE CERTAIN REGIONS
OF A HURRICANE STRONGER?



The hurricane is a spinning mass of thunderstorms. These storms form in bands that spin around the center of circulation. The winds are strongest near the center of circulation. This region is called the eye wall. The closer a place is to the eye wall the stronger the winds can be expected to be.

The onshore region of a hurricane tends to be stronger. When a hurricane makes landfall the wind will be coming from the ocean toward the land (onshore) on one side of the hurricane and the wind will be coming from the land toward the ocean (offshore) on the other side of the hurricane. The onshore winds are stronger because there is less friction over the ocean surface. The storm surge is the strongest in this region also since the winds are piling ocean water toward the land.

On the onshore side of a hurricane the hurricane’s forward motion combines with the storm relative wind velocity. Thus, this also contributes to winds being stronger on the onshore side especially for faster moving hurricanes. As air moves from the water onto land it is sheared. The land slows the wind down somewhat while the wind speeds aloft remain at a stronger intensity. This produces vertical speed shear. Friction also turns the wind more toward lower pressure over the land. This produces vertical directional shear. This enhanced shear with the presence of thunderstorms increases the likelihood of tornadoes. Thus, it is common for a tornado watch to be issued for the Northeast quadrant of a hurricane. This quadrant is the region that often experiences onshore flow.




The Mānoa Disaster Preparedness Team is No More

Wait. What happened?  Not to worry.  The Mānoa Disaster Preparedness Team has changed its name to Be Ready Mānoa.  Same people, same mission.  We are now officially a corporation (unfortunately NOT tax exempt) of community volunteers.  The official information is:

Be Ready Mānoa
P.O. Box 61623
Honolulu, HI  96822
email – info@bereadymanoa.org
Website – bereadymanoa.org

Lots of things are happening.  You may notice  our new logo above thanks to Courtney Hara a UH senior in graphic design.  Also, plans for the Be Ready Mānoa community fair in September are going full speed ahead.  Sponsors, vendors, exhibitors, entertainment and much more are lined up.  Plans are to stimulate interest by involving local schools and school kids in disaster preparedness and education.

Stay tuned for future developments including the unveiling of our super hero mascot “Disaster Blaster”.